The lack of affordable rental housing and the sharp rise in rents have become key issues in Alberta. On December 5, 2023, Alberta’s Housing Critic tabled a Private Members’ Bill to introduce temporary rent caps. Bill 205 represents a vital first step toward rent regulation in the province, and if implemented, can help keep Alberta’s renters in their homes.  

Our Advocacy Toolkit for Bill 205 offers several actions that you can take to lend your voice in support of the bill and rent regulations in Alberta. 


Highlights include:

  • Why rent regulation is needed in Alberta.
  • Signing and starting petitions to the provincial government.
  • Sending a formal letter of support for Bill 205. Read our letter of support here.
  • How to participate in the public consultation.

See also: Our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate.
A picture of the Canadian flag among others


On this page, find key information about the rent regulation laws in place in your province or territory, including about:

  • Rent control policies that are in place
  • Rules around rent increases
  • Limits on rent increases, and when those limits can be lifted
  • Rent increases and limits when renters change

* The information on this page was last updated in May 2024.

  • Alberta

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    No, Alberta does not have a rent control policy, and there are no limits to how much a landlord may increase the rent. But there are some rules in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) on how and when rent can be increased.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart.
    • A landlord must give at least 3 months’ notice before the rent goes up for a month-to-month lease, and 12 weeks’ notice for a week-to-week lease. No written notice is required for a fixed term lease. A fixed term lease starts and ends on specified dates.
    • A landlord cannot increase the rent midway through a fixed term lease agreement and must wait until the fixed-term agreement has ended.
  • British Columbia

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    Yes, British Columbia has a rent control policy in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) which sets the maximum limits by which landlords can increase the rent every year.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart.
    • Each year a landlord can only increase the rent according to the limits set in the RTA.
    • Sometimes a landlord can raise the rent if the Residential Tenancies Branch, the body that resolves disputes between landlords and tenants, decides that they can or if the renters agree to an increase in writing.
    • If a landlord does not raise the rent, they cannot apply a rent increase retroactively the following year.
    • A landlord must give at least 3 months’ notice before the rent goes up.

    Can my landlord increase my rent by more than what limit allows?

    If a landlord wants to raise the rent beyond the limits allowed in the RTA, they can apply to the Residential Tenancies Branch. The RTA lists specific reasons why a landlord can apply for an above limit which include:

    • A landlord has completed repairs or renovations that could not have been foreseen under reasonable circumstances and will not happen again within a reasonable time frame.
    • Where an extraordinary increase in operating expenses has caused the landlord to incur a financial loss.
    • Where the landlord incurs a financial loss from financing costs related to a purchase which could not have been foreseen under reasonable circumstances.

    Do rent control limits apply when renters change?

    When a renter leaves a unit, there are no legal limits for how much a landlord can increase the rent for a new renter.

  • Manitoba

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    Yes. Manitoba has a rent control policy in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA)which sets the maximum limits by which landlords can increase the rent every year. There is currently a rent freeze in place which means that for 2022 and 2023 the rent increase limit is 0%.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart.
    • A landlord must give at least 3 months’ written notice before they raise the rent.
    • Some units are exempt from rent control limits in the RTA.
    • When a property owner decides to rent their home or other type of unit as a residential unit for the first time, they can set the rent without following the rent control limits in the RTA. But they cannot increase the rent for 12 months after the renter moves in. After the first year, the annual rent increase limit will apply.

    Can my landlord increase my rent by more than what limit allows?

    A landlord may apply to the Director of Residential Tenancies to be allowed to raise the rent above the annual limit. If a renter objects to the increase, they may file an objection with the Director.

    Do rent control limits apply when renters change?

    If a renter moves out of a unit in a building that has four or more units, the rent charged for the new renter may be increased to the average rent being charged for similar units in the same building if notice is given to the new renters. But if a renter moves out of a rental unit in a building that has three units or less, the landlord can increase the rent by any amount that they decide, if they provide notice to the new renters.

  • New Brunswick

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    Yes. New Brunswick has a rent control policy in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) which says that landlords cannot increase the rent to more than what is reasonable in relation to the rent charged for comparable units in the same geographical area.  However, the policy only applies if a tenant takes steps to enforce it.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart unless the landlord and renter have agreed otherwise in writing.
    • Landlords must give at least 3 months’ written notice before they raise the rent for a fixed term lease (a lease that starts and ends on specified dates), and at least 6 months’ notice for a lease that is week-to-week, month-to-month, or year-to-year.
    • If a rent increase amount is for more than what is reasonable in relation to the rent charged for comparable units in the same geographical area, the tenant can apply to a residential tenancies officer to cancel the increase. However, if the tenant does not file that application, then the increase is allowed. 
    • If a rent increase amount is for more than the consumer price index (inflation rate), the tenant can apply to a residential tenancies officer to delay part of the increase by one to two years. However, if the tenant does not file that application, then the whole increase can take place in the first year. 
  • Newfoundland and Labradaor

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to some rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    No. Newfoundland and Labrador does not have a rent control policy, and there are no limits to how much a landlord may increase the rent. But there are some rules in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) on how and when rent can be increased.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart.
    • A landlord has to give a renter 6 months’ written notice before they raise the rent for a month-to-month or fixed term lease, and 8 weeks’ notice for a week-to-week lease.
    • If a landlord wants to raise the rent because they are providing a new or additional service, the landlord and renter can agree to the increase in writing and there is no need for written notice from the landlord in this case.
  • Northwest Territories

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my territory have a rent control policy?

    No. Northwest Territories does not have a rent control policy, and there are no limits to how much a landlord may increase the rent. But there are some rules in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) on how and when rent can be increased.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart.
    • Landlords must give renters 3 months’ written notice before raising the rent.
    • If a renter wants to end their lease because of a rent increase, the landlord must give the new renter a copy of the last notice of rent increase and rent the unit at the same price. This does not apply to subsidized housing.
  • Nova Scotia

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    No. Nova Scotia does not have a permanent rent control policy, and there are no limits to how much a landlord may increase the rent. But there are some rules in the Residential Tenancies Act on how and when rent can be increased. The province implemented a temporary rent control policy in November 2020 in response to the COVID-19 Pandemic, which is set to expire on December 31, 2023.

    What are the general rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart.
    • A landlord must provide 4 months’ written notice before raising the rent for year-to-year and month-to-month leases, and 8 weeks’ written notice for week-to-week leases.
    • For fixed term leases, which start and end on specified dates, the lease must state the amount of any rent increases and the dates of when they will start, which cannot be more than once in one year.
    • These rules do not apply to subsidized housing.

    What is the temporary rent control policy?

    • As of 2024, landlords cannot raise the rent by more than 5% annually. Since this is a temporary policy, it might change in future years.
    • This does not apply to renters signing a new lease, except renters who have a fixed-term lease and are signing a lease for an additional fixed-term in the same rental unit. It also does not apply to renters living in subsidized housing.
  • Nunavut

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my territory have a rent control policy?

    No. Nunavut does not have a rent control policy, and there are no limits to how much a landlord may increase the rent. But there are some rules in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) on how and when rent can be increased.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • Landlords cannot increase the rent more than once in a 12-month period.
    • Landlords must provide renters with 3 months’ written notice before they raise the rent.
    • If a renter wants to end their lease because of a rent increase, the landlord must give the new renter a copy of the last notice of rent increase and rent the unit at the same price. This does not apply to subsidized housing.
  • Ontario

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    Yes, Ontario has a rent control policy in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) which sets the maximum limits by which landlords can increase the rent every year. In Ontario these are referred to as guidelines.

    What are the rules of rent increases?

    After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart.

    Landlords must give renters a written notice of at least 90 days before the rent goes up. The notice should be on one of the forms from the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB).  Even if the landlord does not use the LTB form, a notice might still be valid if it includes all the information that can be found on the LTB form.

    Can my landlord increase my rent by more than what limit allows?

    Landlords can apply to the LTB for permission to raise the rent by more than what is allowed in the guideline. This is referred to as an above guideline increase or AGI. The RTA lists specific reasons why a landlord can apply for an AGI which include:

    • An increase in the cost of municipal taxes and charges.
    • Extra costs incurred from repairing the building or one or more of the units in it.
    • Operational costs related to security services provided for the building by someone other than the landlord. Renters can challenge a landlord’s application for an AGI at the LTB.

    If the landlord gets approval for an AGI, they must still wait 12 months between rent increases and give 90 days’ written notice to the renter before the rent goes up.

    Do rent control limits apply when renters change?

    When a renter leaves a unit, there are no legal limits for how much a landlord can increase the rent for a new renter.

  • Prince Edward Island

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    Yes, Prince Edward Island has a rent control policy in the Rental of Residential Property Act. Each year the amount of rent increase that is allowed is decided by the Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission (IRAC). IRAC considers several factors to calculate the rent increase limit including vacancy rates, the economic outlook for the province, and changes to the Consumer Price Index.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart, even if a new renter moves into the unit.
    • For a weekly lease, landlords must provide at least 3 weeks’ written notice before raising the rent and 3 months’ written notice for a monthly lease.

    Can my landlord increase my rent by more than what limit allows?

    If a landlord wants to raise the rent above the limit that is allowed, they must apply to the Office of the Director of Residential Rental Property, and the Director will decide on the increase. A hearing must take place which may be attended by the renter. The Director will consider different factors when making their decision including:

    • Whether the increase is necessary to prevent the landlord from sustaining a financial loss in the operation of the rental units;
    • Increased operating costs or capital expenditures provided by the landlord;
    • The expectation of the landlord to have a reasonable return on their capital investment; and
    • The date and amount of the last rent increase.
    • Other factors that were added in 2023. More time will be needed to find out how the new factors will affect the Director’s decisions.

    Do rent control limits apply when renters change?

    Rent increases are attached to the unit and not the renter. Rent cannot be automatically increased between different renters. If a new renter moves in, the landlord can only increase the rent according to the rules around rent increases mentioned above. If a landlord wants to increase the rent beyond the limit, they must apply to the Office of the Director of Residential Rental Property.

  • Quebec

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    Yes, but it only applies if a tenant refuses a proposed increase within one month of receiving notice of it.  If a tenant doesn’t refuse, then a landlord can increase the rent by any amount.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • A landlord must give proper notice of any rent increase.
    • Both the landlord and renter must agree that a rent increase is reasonable before the rent is raised. The renter has the right to accept or refuse the proposed increase within 1 month of receiving notice of it.
    • If a renter rejects a proposed rent increase, the landlord may apply to the Quebec Rental Board so that it can determine what the rent should be or make a decision on the rent increase.
    • The Quebec Rental Board publishes guidelines every year on suggested rent increases, but landlords are not required to follow them.
    • If a lease provides for a change in rent, the landlord or renter may apply to the Quebec Rental Board to contest the change if it is too little or too much and ask the Board to decide on the rent amount.
    • A renter or someone who is subletting a unit may apply to the Quebec Rental Board to have their rent determined by the Board, if their rent is higher than the lowest rent paid during the 12-month period preceding the beginning of the lease or sublease, unless that rent has already been determined by the Board.
    • In all instances where rent is determined by the Board, it will remain in force for the term of the lease.
  • Saskatchewan

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my province have a rent control policy?

    No. Saskatchewan does not have a rent control policy, and there are no limits to how much a landlord may increase the rent. But there are some rules in the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) on how and when rent can be increased.

    What are the rules around rent increases?

    • In a fixed term lease, which has a specific end date, landlords are not allowed to raise rent during the duration of the lease unless at the beginning of the lease the landlord and renter agree on how much the increase will be and when the rent will be raised.
    • For a periodic lease, which is a lease that continues until it is ended by the tenant or landlord according to the rules of the RTA, landlords must give the renter written notice at least 12 months before raising the rent and cannot raise the rent more than once a year.
    • If a landlord is a member of the Saskatchewan Landlord Association or the Network of Non-Profit Housing Providers of Saskatchewan, they may give a renter 6 months’ advance written notice before raising the rent and shall not increase rent more than twice each year.
    • These rules do not apply to subsidized housing in which a tenant’s rent is based on their household income.
  • Yukon

    Can my landlord increase my rent?

    Yes, subject to certain rules.

    Does my territory have a rent control policy?

    No. Yukon does not have a permanent rent control policy and there are no limits to how much a landlord may increase the rent. But there are some rules in the Residential Landlord and Tenant Act on how and when rent can be increased. A temporary rent control policy was introduced in May 2021 that will be in place until January 31, 2023.

    What are the general rules around rent increases?

    • After a renter moves in, a landlord must wait at least 12 months before raising the rent. After that, any rent increases must also be 12 months apart.
    • A landlord must give a renter 3 months’ written notice before raising the rent.

    What is the temporary rent control policy?

    • Landlords cannot raise the rent by more than the annual rent limit that is set by the territory. For 2022 the limit is 3.3%.
    • The annual rent limit is tied to a renter not the rental unit. When a landlord begins a lease with a new renter, they may agree to a new rent which could be below, at, or above Yukon’s annual rent limit. Once the new lease begins, it is then subject to the annual rent limit.
    • Annual rent limits do not apply to housing where the rent is tied to the renter’s household income.

Tell your government: It’s time for strong rent regulation

As a tenant leader, advocating for tenant communities on the ground will require a fair knowledge of the policies and legal frameworks through which the right to housing is implemented in Canada. This toolbox provides a range of practical resources to support your leadership and advocacy work, with tools to increase your understanding of the right to housing in Canada.  


Knowing your rights and informing your community

Tenant leaders will usually be the first point of contact for impacted communities – with tenants themselves but also politicians, developers, lawyers and housing service providers. A key aspect of your advocacy work will be information: knowing which laws and policies regulate housing and how to best navigate the housing system will go a long way in preparing your claims and providing support to fellow tenants.  


Explore the Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

Toolkit:

Resources:

Guides:


Additional resources

The Canadian Centre for Housing Rights (CCHR) has an online repository of resources on the right to housing in Canada. Below are some key resources on the right to housing, rental housing and the rights of tenants. 

Housing Laws

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: A Responsibility of all Governments

Right to Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Planning and Development Tools

Financialization of Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Renovations and Upgrading

Right to Housing

The National Housing Strategy Act – a Primer

Affordability

Rent control policies across Canada

Evictions

Resources for renters facing eviction


See also: city-specific resources for Calgary, Halifax and Winnipeg


As a tenant leader, advocating for tenant communities on the ground will require a fair knowledge of local and regional resources on housing rights. This toolbox provides a range of resources to support your leadership and advocacy work. You will find tools to increase your understanding of the right to housing in Canada, where to find assistance to protect your right to housing and online resources to engage with housing stakeholders, including your local and provincial governments.  


Knowing your rights and informing your community

Tenant leaders will usually be the first point of contact for impacted communities – with tenants themselves but also politicians, developers, lawyers and housing service providers. A key aspect of your advocacy work will be information: knowing which laws and policies regulate housing and how to best navigate the housing system will go a long way in preparing your claims and providing support to fellow tenants.  


Explore the Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

Toolkit:

Resources:

Guides:


Resources in your province

Protecting your rights as a tenant

When dealing with landlord and tenant issues, it is helpful to quickly know where to turn to for legal information and support. Below you will find a list of legal resources. 

Who can make decisions on your tenancy?

Where can you go for legal help and information?

Working with other housing advocates

Collective action is a powerful way to claim your right to housing and that of your community: reaching out to grassroots organizations and community advocates will help you strengthen your advocacy work and amplify your claims. It also provides an opportunity to stay informed about local tenant initiatives that you can contribute to. You can also participate in municipal advisory committees or approach tenants and government officials sitting in these committees to represent your interests at City Council. Below is a list of some tenant advocacy groups. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list and there may be other groups active in your communities.  

Tenant advocacy groups

Advisory committees

Engaging with your government

To advocate to your municipal or provincial government, the links below will help you prepare your submissions and deputations.  

Calgary City Council

Province of Alberta


Additional resources

The Canadian Centre for Housing Rights (CCHR) has an online repository of resources on the right to housing in Canada. Below are some key documents on the right to housing, rental housing and the rights of tenants. 

Housing Laws

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: A Responsibility of all Governments

Right to Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Planning and Development Tools

Financialization of Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Renovations and Upgrading

Right to Housing

The National Housing Strategy Act – a Primer

Affordability

Rent control policies across Canada

Evictions

Resources for renters facing eviction


This toolkit offers tenant leaders with a range of practical information to support their advocacy work to claim the right to housing in their communities. It provides an overview of the main principles of the right to housing, Canada’s obligations to implement the right to housing, and policies at different levels of government that can help advance the right to housing. It also outlines what a human rights-based approach to housing can look like, examples of systemic housing issues experienced in Canada, and practical tools that can help tenants mobilize their communities and effectively participate in decision-making processes.  


Highlights include:

  • The right to adequate housing in international and domestic law.
  • A human rights-based approach to housing.
  • Systemic housing issues.
  • Towards rights-based housing policy.
  • Tools for community participation and advocacy.
  • Right to housing leadership in the community.


This toolkit is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

This resource is designed to help tenant leaders develop inclusive and participatory strategies to engage their community to claim their right to housing. It outlines the key principles for increased participation within tenant communities, building effective leadership, and mobilizing and organizing tenants. It also offers a guide on how to create strategic planning tools such as community action plans, communication plans and advocacy plans. 


Highlights include:

  • Sharing information and knowledge.
  • Increasing meaningful engagement.
  • Developing effective leadership.
  • Mobilizing and organizing tenant communities.
  • Building a community action plan.
  • Supporting policy advocacy through a communication plan.
  • A housing advocacy plan worksheet (download the printable version).

This resource is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate
Targeting your housing advocacy: A resource for tenant leaders.

This resource is designed to help tenant leaders understand the responsibilities of each level of government to implement the right to housing, so that they can target their housing advocacy more effectively. It outlines the obligations of each level of government to implement the right to housing, as well as how to overcome jurisdictional challenges. It also offers a guide on what tenant leaders can do to advocate for their right to housing at each level of government.  


Highlights include:

  • Canada’s obligation to implement the right to housing.
  • Legal and policy framework on the right to housing.
  • Jurisdictional challenges.
  • Opportunities for advocacy.

This resource is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

This resource provides an overview of a human rights-based approach to housing. It is designed to help tenant leaders identify the root causes of housing challenges, the groups whose rights are most impacted by those challenges, and the institutions that have an obligation resolve them. It provides guiding tools to develop rights-based housing solutions and to hold institutions accountable for implementing the right to housing.


Highlights include:

  • What is a Human Rights-Based Approach (HRBA).
  • Who are rights-holders and duty-bearers.
  • Why is a rights-based approach necessary in housing policy.
  • What are the PANEL Principles and how can they be used in community-based policy advocacy.

This resource is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

This document guides tenant leaders on how to effectively engage with their local government to advance the right to housing in their communities. It includes information on how City Councils address housing issues, and provides guidelines for tenant leaders to make submissions and deputations at City Council meetings so that they can advocate for the issues that are most important to them.  


Highlights include:

  • Advocating to city councils.
  • Looking up board and committee meetings.
  • Making a deputation.
  • Making a submission.

This guide is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

This guide provides tenant leaders with information on how to effectively engage with their provincial or territorial government to advance the right to housing in their communities. It includes an overview of how provinces and territories regulate the rights of tenants, and how provincial and territorial legislatures introduce laws that can impact the right to housing. It also includes a guide for tenant leaders on how to be involved in these processes by writing a letter to their local representative or petitioning the legislative assembly.  


Highlights include:

  • Understanding the role of Members of Legislative Assemblies (MLAs) and ridings.
  • Following upcoming bills at the legislative assembly.
  • How to write a letter to your MLA.
  • How to petition your provincial government.

This guide is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

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