The lack of affordable rental housing and the sharp rise in rents have become key issues in Alberta. On December 5, 2023, Alberta’s Housing Critic tabled a Private Members’ Bill to introduce temporary rent caps. Bill 205 represents a vital first step toward rent regulation in the province, and if implemented, can help keep Alberta’s renters in their homes.  

Our Advocacy Toolkit for Bill 205 offers several actions that you can take to lend your voice in support of the bill and rent regulations in Alberta. 


Highlights include:

  • Why rent regulation is needed in Alberta.
  • Signing and starting petitions to the provincial government.
  • Sending a formal letter of support for Bill 205. Read our letter of support here.
  • How to participate in the public consultation.

See also: Our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate.

As a tenant leader, advocating for tenant communities on the ground will require a fair knowledge of the policies and legal frameworks through which the right to housing is implemented in Canada. This toolbox provides a range of practical resources to support your leadership and advocacy work, with tools to increase your understanding of the right to housing in Canada.  


Knowing your rights and informing your community

Tenant leaders will usually be the first point of contact for impacted communities – with tenants themselves but also politicians, developers, lawyers and housing service providers. A key aspect of your advocacy work will be information: knowing which laws and policies regulate housing and how to best navigate the housing system will go a long way in preparing your claims and providing support to fellow tenants.  


Explore the Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

Toolkit:

Resources:

Guides:


Additional resources

The Canadian Centre for Housing Rights (CCHR) has an online repository of resources on the right to housing in Canada. Below are some key resources on the right to housing, rental housing and the rights of tenants. 

Housing Laws

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: A Responsibility of all Governments

Right to Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Planning and Development Tools

Financialization of Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Renovations and Upgrading

Right to Housing

The National Housing Strategy Act – a Primer

Affordability

Rent control policies across Canada

Evictions

Resources for renters facing eviction


See also: city-specific resources for Calgary, Halifax and Winnipeg


As a tenant leader, advocating for tenant communities on the ground will require a fair knowledge of local and regional resources on housing rights. This toolbox provides a range of resources to support your leadership and advocacy work. You will find tools to increase your understanding of the right to housing in Canada, where to find assistance to protect your right to housing and online resources to engage with housing stakeholders, including your local and provincial governments.  


Knowing your rights and informing your community

Tenant leaders will usually be the first point of contact for impacted communities – with tenants themselves but also politicians, developers, lawyers and housing service providers. A key aspect of your advocacy work will be information: knowing which laws and policies regulate housing and how to best navigate the housing system will go a long way in preparing your claims and providing support to fellow tenants.  


Explore the Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

Toolkit:

Resources:

Guides:


Resources in your province

Protecting your rights as a tenant

When dealing with landlord and tenant issues, it is helpful to quickly know where to turn to for legal information and support. Below you will find a list of legal resources. 

Who can make decisions on your tenancy?

Where can you go for legal help and information?

Working with other housing advocates

Collective action is a powerful way to claim your right to housing and that of your community: reaching out to grassroots organizations and community advocates will help you strengthen your advocacy work and amplify your claims. It also provides an opportunity to stay informed about local tenant initiatives that you can contribute to. You can also participate in municipal advisory committees or approach tenants and government officials sitting in these committees to represent your interests at City Council. Below is a list of some tenant advocacy groups. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list and there may be other groups active in your communities.  

Tenant advocacy groups

Advisory committees

Engaging with your government

To advocate to your municipal or provincial government, the links below will help you prepare your submissions and deputations.  

Halifax and Cape Breton City Council

Province of Nova Scotia


Additional resources

The Canadian Centre for Housing Rights (CCHR) has an online repository of resources on the right to housing in Canada. Below are some key documents on the right to housing, rental housing and the rights of tenants. 

Housing Laws

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: A Responsibility of all Governments

Right to Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Planning and Development Tools

Financialization of Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Renovations and Upgrading

Right to Housing

The National Housing Strategy Act – a Primer

Affordability

Rent control policies across Canada

Evictions

Resources for renters facing eviction


As a tenant leader, advocating for tenant communities on the ground will require a fair knowledge of local and regional resources on housing rights. This toolbox provides a range of resources to support your leadership and advocacy work. You will find tools to increase your understanding of the right to housing in Canada, where to find assistance to protect your right to housing and online resources to engage with housing stakeholders, including your local and provincial governments.  


Knowing your rights and informing your community

Tenant leaders will usually be the first point of contact for impacted communities – with tenants themselves but also politicians, developers, lawyers and housing service providers. A key aspect of your advocacy work will be information: knowing which laws and policies regulate housing and how to best navigate the housing system will go a long way in preparing your claims and providing support to fellow tenants.  


Explore the Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

Toolkit:

Resources:

Guides:


Resources in your province

Protecting your rights as a tenant

When dealing with landlord and tenant issues, it is helpful to quickly know where to turn to for legal information and support. Below you will find a list of legal resources. 

Who can make decisions on your tenancy?

Where can you go for legal help and information?

Working with other housing advocates

Collective action is a powerful way to claim your right to housing and that of your community: reaching out to grassroots organizations and community advocates will help you strengthen your advocacy work and amplify your claims. It also provides an opportunity to stay informed about local tenant initiatives that you can contribute to. You can also participate in municipal advisory committees or approach tenants and government officials sitting in these committees to represent your interests at City Council. Below is a list of some tenant advocacy groups. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list and there may be other groups active in your communities.  

Tenant advocacy groups

Engaging with your government

To advocate to your municipal or provincial government, the links below will help you prepare your submissions and deputations.  

Winnipeg City Council

Province of Manitoba


Additional resources

The Canadian Centre for Housing Rights (CCHR) has an online repository of resources on the right to housing in Canada. Below are some key documents on the right to housing, rental housing and the rights of tenants. 

Housing Laws

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: A Responsibility of all Governments

Right to Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Planning and Development Tools

Financialization of Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Renovations and Upgrading

Right to Housing

The National Housing Strategy Act – a Primer

Affordability

Rent control policies across Canada

Evictions

Resources for renters facing eviction


As a tenant leader, advocating for tenant communities on the ground will require a fair knowledge of local and regional resources on housing rights. This toolbox provides a range of resources to support your leadership and advocacy work. You will find tools to increase your understanding of the right to housing in Canada, where to find assistance to protect your right to housing and online resources to engage with housing stakeholders, including your local and provincial governments.  


Knowing your rights and informing your community

Tenant leaders will usually be the first point of contact for impacted communities – with tenants themselves but also politicians, developers, lawyers and housing service providers. A key aspect of your advocacy work will be information: knowing which laws and policies regulate housing and how to best navigate the housing system will go a long way in preparing your claims and providing support to fellow tenants.  


Explore the Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

Toolkit:

Resources:

Guides:


Resources in your province

Protecting your rights as a tenant

When dealing with landlord and tenant issues, it is helpful to quickly know where to turn to for legal information and support. Below you will find a list of legal resources. 

Who can make decisions on your tenancy?

Where can you go for legal help and information?

Working with other housing advocates

Collective action is a powerful way to claim your right to housing and that of your community: reaching out to grassroots organizations and community advocates will help you strengthen your advocacy work and amplify your claims. It also provides an opportunity to stay informed about local tenant initiatives that you can contribute to. You can also participate in municipal advisory committees or approach tenants and government officials sitting in these committees to represent your interests at City Council. Below is a list of some tenant advocacy groups. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list and there may be other groups active in your communities.  

Tenant advocacy groups

Advisory committees

Engaging with your government

To advocate to your municipal or provincial government, the links below will help you prepare your submissions and deputations.  

Calgary City Council

Province of Alberta


Additional resources

The Canadian Centre for Housing Rights (CCHR) has an online repository of resources on the right to housing in Canada. Below are some key documents on the right to housing, rental housing and the rights of tenants. 

Housing Laws

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: A Responsibility of all Governments

Right to Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Planning and Development Tools

Financialization of Housing

Implementing the Right to Housing in Canada: Renovations and Upgrading

Right to Housing

The National Housing Strategy Act – a Primer

Affordability

Rent control policies across Canada

Evictions

Resources for renters facing eviction


This toolkit offers tenant leaders with a range of practical information to support their advocacy work to claim the right to housing in their communities. It provides an overview of the main principles of the right to housing, Canada’s obligations to implement the right to housing, and policies at different levels of government that can help advance the right to housing. It also outlines what a human rights-based approach to housing can look like, examples of systemic housing issues experienced in Canada, and practical tools that can help tenants mobilize their communities and effectively participate in decision-making processes.  


Highlights include:

  • The right to adequate housing in international and domestic law.
  • A human rights-based approach to housing.
  • Systemic housing issues.
  • Towards rights-based housing policy.
  • Tools for community participation and advocacy.
  • Right to housing leadership in the community.


This toolkit is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

This resource is designed to help tenant leaders develop inclusive and participatory strategies to engage their community to claim their right to housing. It outlines the key principles for increased participation within tenant communities, building effective leadership, and mobilizing and organizing tenants. It also offers a guide on how to create strategic planning tools such as community action plans, communication plans and advocacy plans. 


Highlights include:

  • Sharing information and knowledge.
  • Increasing meaningful engagement.
  • Developing effective leadership.
  • Mobilizing and organizing tenant communities.
  • Building a community action plan.
  • Supporting policy advocacy through a communication plan.
  • A housing advocacy plan worksheet (download the printable version).

This resource is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate
Targeting your housing advocacy: A resource for tenant leaders.

This resource is designed to help tenant leaders understand the responsibilities of each level of government to implement the right to housing, so that they can target their housing advocacy more effectively. It outlines the obligations of each level of government to implement the right to housing, as well as how to overcome jurisdictional challenges. It also offers a guide on what tenant leaders can do to advocate for their right to housing at each level of government.  


Highlights include:

  • Canada’s obligation to implement the right to housing.
  • Legal and policy framework on the right to housing.
  • Jurisdictional challenges.
  • Opportunities for advocacy.

This resource is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

This resource provides an overview of a human rights-based approach to housing. It is designed to help tenant leaders identify the root causes of housing challenges, the groups whose rights are most impacted by those challenges, and the institutions that have an obligation resolve them. It provides guiding tools to develop rights-based housing solutions and to hold institutions accountable for implementing the right to housing.


Highlights include:

  • What is a Human Rights-Based Approach (HRBA).
  • Who are rights-holders and duty-bearers.
  • Why is a rights-based approach necessary in housing policy.
  • What are the PANEL Principles and how can they be used in community-based policy advocacy.

This resource is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

This document guides tenant leaders on how to effectively engage with their local government to advance the right to housing in their communities. It includes information on how City Councils address housing issues, and provides guidelines for tenant leaders to make submissions and deputations at City Council meetings so that they can advocate for the issues that are most important to them.  


Highlights include:

  • Advocating to city councils.
  • Looking up board and committee meetings.
  • Making a deputation.
  • Making a submission.

This guide is part of our Tenant Leaders’ Toolbox

Inside the toolbox you’ll find:

  • A toolkit on implementing the right to housing in Canada.
  • Resources on a human rights-based approach to housing, empowering communities to claim this right, and how to target your advocacy.
  • Guides on engaging with local, provincial and territorial governments, and how to make a submission to the Federal Housing Advocate

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